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Partner swapping: a climate change survival strategy

Some species of lichen grow under very different climatic conditions. They are true survival artists. Now new research published in New Phytologist suggests that the secret to their success lies in their willingness to be unfai...

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Keeping the salt out of wine

New research published in New Phytologist points the way towards the breeding of salt tolerant grapevines that are likely to improve the sustainability of the Australian wine sector.   With funding from Wine Austra...

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Camel crickets carry seeds

Heterotrophic plants can often be found on the forest floor. Down there, in the dark, where the wind seldom reaches, common methods of seed dispersal stop working. But new research by Professor Kenji Suetsugu (@tugutuguk) ...

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New Phytologist Editor named the L'Oreal-UNESCO For Women in Science Laureate for Latin America

New Phytologist Environment section Editor and Tansley Medal judge, Professor Amy Austin, has been named the L'Oreal-UNESCO For Women in Science Laureate for Latin America.   The 2018 L'Oreal-UNESCO For Wom...

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We are recruiting!

We are recruiting!   Do you wish to join the New Phytologist Central Office team? We are currently recruiting for an Editorial Assistant and a Managing Editor to join our team, based at the University of Lancaster.   Plea...

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Trigger warning: how the Venus flytrap got its snap

Botanical carnivory is just one of many ways in which plants have adapted to cope with low levels of nutrients in the soil. Carnivorous plants have evolved specialised leaves, called traps, for prey attraction, capture and digestion. The traps are...

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Do longer growing seasons mean bigger seeds?

Researchers at the University of Granada have proposed, for the first time, 'universal laws' for seed size and biology. Using mathematical models and an exhaustive data analysis of 500 plant species, they showed that the global distribution of dor...

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Nectar microbes enhance floral allure

Research recently published in New Phytologist shows how pollinators get a buzz out of more than a flower's nectar.   A honey bee heading toward lupine. Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey.   Nectar-living microbes rel...

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Seeing red: the evolutionary path to beet-red beets

Put a ruby raspberry up against a crimson beet and look closely. You might just notice: they are different reds.   Millions of years ago, one family of plants — the beets and their cousins — hit upon a brand new red pigmen...

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American oaks share a common northern ancestor

A new paper, published in New Phytologist, tells the evolutionary story of American oak for the first time.   If you had gone down to the woods in northern Canada, 45 million years ago, you might have encountered the distant ancestor ...

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