News

News

Less chewing the cud, more greening the fuel

Plant biomass contains considerable calorific value but most of it makes up robust cell walls, an unappetising evolutionary advantage that helped grasses to survive foragers and prosper for more than 60 million years.   The trouble ...

Find out more

Higher temperatures turn pollen purple

There are plenty of studies on how petal colour varies, but new research looks at differences in the performance of pollen under varied environmental conditions based on its colour. In the study of the North American herb Campanul...

Find out more

Prof. Dali Guo, 1971–2017

Dali Guo passed away on 19 November 2017 at the young age of 46 after an extended fight with lung cancer. He leaves behind his loving wife, Ping Wang and 14-year-old daughter, Hengjia.   Dali Guo. Photograph credit: Bo Liu. &nb...

Find out more

New research examines the origin of xanthones in plant roots

New research shows how antimicrobial compounds are formed in plants, and where to find them.   Xanthones are specialised compounds with antimicrobial properties. Derivatives of xanthones have attracted attention for medicine design....

Find out more

Unlocking the patterns of climate change

How will plant species respond to climate change?   Amid thickets of fragrant rosemary and thyme, researchers from the University of Tübingen have developed a technique that will help to answer this question. Dr Mark Bilton&...

Find out more

The yin-yang of uranium in Arabidopsis

Uranium isn't something people tend to think about in a positive light. But scientists from the Université Grenoble Alpes and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energies Commission (CEA) have shown how the to...

Find out more

Once bitten... caterpillar attacks allow aphids to sneak up on plants

Plants face a formidable array of attackers and have to defend themselves. In a new paper published in New Phytologist, scientists describe two surprising discoveries: that plants prioritise the protection of flowers over leaves, and that sim...

Find out more

Plants that clean up: heavy metal hyperaccumulators

Hyperaccumulators are unusual. Able to absorb much larger amounts of metal compounds in their leaves and stems than normal plants, they are very useful for cleaning up contaminated land. Now researchers have published a database that pro...

Find out more

Partner swapping: a climate change survival strategy

Some species of lichen grow under very different climatic conditions. They are true survival artists. Now new research published in New Phytologist suggests that the secret to their success lies in their willingness to be unfai...

Find out more

Keeping the salt out of wine

New research published in New Phytologist points the way towards the breeding of salt tolerant grapevines that are likely to improve the sustainability of the Australian wine sector.   With funding from Wine Austra...

Find out more
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9