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Raising a stink: plants smell different when they are eaten by exotic herbivores

When they are chewed by insects or other small animals, many plants react by releasing odours to attract the herbivore’s enemies. New research published in New Phytologist reveals that the odour bouquet depends on the type of herbivore that ...

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New Phytologist Editors' Choice: March 2017, 213:4

In this issue’s Editors' Choice we are pleased to feature the work of the Tansley Medal winner and finalists. The New Phytologist Tansley Medal is awarded annually to a scientist in the early stages of his or her career in recognition of...

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Snap, digest, respire: Scientists show how the Venus flytrap uses its prey’s nitrogen compounds to extract energy

The Venus flytrap captures insects for more than just nutritional purposes. A research team lead by Prof. Dr. Heinz Rennenberg and Lukas Fasbender from the Institute of Forest Sciences at the University of Freiburg has proven the carnivorous plant...

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Tansley insight featured in BBC earth article

A Tansley insight by Olivier Hamant has been featured in a BBC earth article.   You can read the article here: 'Plants can see, hear and smell - and respond'   Olivier Hamant wrote about his Tansley insight in a p...

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Thank you to all our reviewers in 2016!

New Phytologist wishes to thank all the individuals listed below who offered up their time to review manuscripts for the journal in 2016. The Editorial Board and Central Office staff greatly appreciate the voluntary contribution and expert advice ...

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Synthetic primer of plant defence was produced in plants all along

For years, researchers have applied beta-aminobutyric acid (BABA) to plants to prime them to respond to stresses such as infection or drought. BABA was believed not to be produced by plants, but a team of Swiss researchers developed a powerful new...

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Balancing reactive oxygen species for a better root boundary

Plants adjust the pattern of their roots to maximise nutrient and water uptake from the soil. A new study published in New Phytologist reveals how root growth is controlled by setting the boundaries of new roots using reactive oxygen species (ROS)...

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Life on land: how plants colonised the terrestrial environment

The colonisation of the land by early plants was a key step in evolution, paving the way for life to diversify across the entire planet. Multidisciplinary researchers from the Life and Earth Sciences met in Bristol, UK, to discuss the latest advan...

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Innovations in plant evolutionary developmental biology

In a field often dominated by animal biology, plant evolutionary development (evodevo) scientists from around the world travelled to Beijing, China, to discuss the latest advances and future research challenges at the 37th New Phytologist Symposiu...

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With a little help from my fungus: tomato plants are more resistant against nematodes when colonised by a fungus

Plants are constantly challenged by hungry animals and infectious microbes. Nematodes of the species Meloidogyne incognita are an important enemy of tomato plants. The nematodes first induce the roots to form galls, which they then inhabit, feedin...

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