Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 219:1, July 2018

Those aren't coffee beans on the cover of New Phytologist 219:1, but pollen grains. Yuki Nakamura and colleagues from the Institute of Plant and Microbial Biology, Taiwan, and IMBIO, Germany, used a scanning electron microscope to capture the image. There is something wrong with these pollen grains. Look closely and you'll see that some of them appear crumpled, misshapen. ...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 218:4, May 2018

How plants breathe under water Two rice leaves emerge from floodwater. The one on the right has superhydrophobic cuticles, and thus the submerged portion of the leaf traps a thin layer of gas (visible as a silvery sheen). The leaf on the left has been brushed with a dilute detergent to remove hydrophobicity and prevent the gas film from forming. The photo shows how effectiv...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 218:3, May 2018

In this instalment of Behind the Cover, Kai Konrad describes the exciting combination of methods that his research group is using to find out more about the growth of pollen tubes. My group is interested in the role of ion channels, particularly anion channels, in pollen tube growth. Pollen tubes are formed after pollen (the male gametophyte) land on the stigma, a female part ...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 218:2: April 2018

Hyperaccumulator plants have the unusual ability to accumulate extreme concentrations of metal(loid)s in their living tissues. In the Tansley review behind the latest cover of New Phytologist, Antony van der Ent and colleagues discuss the different techniques, based on X-rays, used for probing the internal distribution and chemical form of different elements in plants. The cov...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 218:1, April 2018

It takes a muscle... Plants may be rooted to the spot, but they can still flex their body parts. A new Review, published in New Phytologist, describes how plants got their moves. The colourful cover of New Phytologist 218:1 is a cross-section showing the primary and secondary phloem of a Cannabis sativa stem. These organs contain 'G-fibres' – specialised structures that are a...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 217:4, March 2018

How to make a tumour Ustilago maydis is a biotrophic fungus that causes smut disease on maize, by reprogramming plant cells to produce massive tumours. Just how this happens at the cellular level in maize leaves has remained unknown, until now. In the paper behind the cover of New Phytologist 217:4, Alexandra Matei and Gunther Doehlemann, of the University of Cologne, tog...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 217:3, February 2018

The cover for New Phytologist 217:3 is rather special, being the first cover to feature a hand-drawn image since 2004. In this instalment of Behind the Cover, authors Claire Stanley and Guido Grossmann reveal more detail about the dual-flow-RootChip, the subject of their recent Methods paper. The artwork illustrates the dual-flow-RootChip, a new technology that enables r...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 217:2, January 2018

Beeten to it: the early origins of beetroot red Millions of years ago, one family of plants — the beets and their cousins — hit upon a brand new pigment and discarded the red used by the rest of the plant world. In the paper behind the cover of New Phytologist 217:2, Hiroshi Maeda and his colleagues describe an ancient loosening up of a key biochemical pathway that set the ...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 217:1, January 2018

The sunflowers on the cover of New Phytologist 217:1 provide much more than a cheerful picture – they could be vital for human health, explains author Laurent Mène-Saffrané in this guest post about the research behind the cover. Vitamin E is one of 13 essential vitamins that we need in our diet, since we can't produce it ourselves. This isoprenoid vitamin is produced exclusi...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 216:4, December 2017

Winter has come to Lake Miroir. Below the surface, deep down in the dark, the lakebed sediments tell a story of ice and fire. These days, snow covers the landscape from December to April, but this hasn't always been the case. This lake contains sediments from the last glaciation, which ended about 15,000 years ago in the Alps. Interestingly these sediments contain proof of a...
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