Katie Field: Underground and overground at ICOM9

In this guest post, Katie Field, researcher in plant-soil interactions and leader of the Field lab at the University of Leeds, UK, reports back from ICOM9, the 9th International Conference on Mycorrhiza, with a round-up of the highlights (and desserts). Mycorrhizal researchers from around the globe converged on the Clarion Congress Hotel in Prague on the 30th July for a week...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 215:4, September 2017

Fungal friend, or foe? In this issue of Behind the Cover, New Phytologist Editor Ian Dickie explains the complicated role of the mushroom gracing the cover of issue 215:4. Amanita muscaria, or fly agaric, is one of the most iconic of fungi: it is the classic mushroom of fairy tales and children's cartoons. Native to the northern hemisphere, it has become a widespread invasi...
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Hidden orchid heterotrophs

While most green plants meet their entire demand for carbon through photosynthesis, some need a helping hand during particular life stages. Orchids produce seeds that require carbon and nutrients from mycorrhizal fungi for germination, a form of nutrition called ‘initial mycoheterotrophy’. Most orchids grow out of it, developing their own ability to fix carbon from photosynthes...
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