Snow is not always white

In some coastal areas in Antarctica, the snow can look red, orange, green, or a blend of all three. This colour is natural and is actually made up of tiny microscopic living cells called snow-algae. Red snow‐algae bloom on Léonie Island, Ryder Bay, Antarctic Peninsula. Courtesy of Matthew Davey. Snow algae are tiny plants that can survive and bloom in the slushy snow du...
Read More

Revealing fungal function

Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 220:4, December 2018 If you went down to the woods this autumn, did you take a moment to have a closer look at the fungi at your feet, to ponder how they could be affected by changes in the way that woodlands are managed? If you didn't, don't worry - that's exactly what New Phytologist Interaction Section Editor, Prof. Francis Martin, has bee...
Read More

Partner swapping: a climate change survival strategy

Some species of lichen grow under very different climatic conditions. They are true survival artists. Now new research published in New Phytologist suggests that the secret to their success lies in their willingness to be unfaithful to their algal partners. Lichens are a classic example of symbiosis, in which a species of algae moves in with a fungus and, in exchange for she...
Read More

Scanning the genetic barcode of plant-pollinator interactions

Tracking changes in ecosystems is both vital and extremely difficult. We need to know how differences in climate and land use will affect the success of different species, and what impacts this will have on the wider environment. Plant-pollinator interactions are particularly important for the stability of ecological communities, but how will these relationships be affected in ...
Read More