How does the Amazon rainforest cope with drought?

The Amazon rainforest has been feeling the heat – and now it's drying out. Droughts are expected to become more prevalent and severe because of climate change. How these droughts affect the rainforest will have a big influence on future warming and global climate. A study led by Dr Marielle Smith and Dr Scott Stark, published in New Phytologist, investigates the Amazon rain...
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Climbing up to keep cool  – Climate change effects on mountain ecosystems

There are two things that make trekking in the Alps so good: the thick hot chocolate waiting for you in the refuge, and the variety of landscapes on offer. Along the mountain slope, different ecosystems are stratified one on top of the other, but recently all of them have been greatly affected by climate change, as the temperature in the Alps has increased faster than the glob...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 219:3, August 2018

It's been hot, hasn't it? While many of us have been enjoying the sunshine, long dry spells are a challenge for plants. The way in which plants control the water content in their leaves is a critical part of their response to climate change. Researchers are finding out more about the ways that plants reduce transpiration rates when their leaves dry out. The photo, taken by Ch...
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Tropical forest response to drought depends on age

In most of the tropics, droughts are becoming more frequent and severe as a result of climate change. All trees are not created equal, however. Research published in New Phytologist suggests that tropical forests in Panama get better at coping with drought as they get older. Mario Bretfeld and colleagues at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute used plant water use data ...
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Ancient and modern threats to Sir Arthur’s woodlands – forests of temperate climates

In a new guest post, author Frank Gilliam tells the story behind his Tansley review, 'Forest ecosystems of temperate climatic regions: from ancient use to climate change'. Find out more about the Tansley reviews series, and search the database, here. I suspect that I am not alone among my fellow plant ecologists in having professional ‘heroes’—individuals who played crucial ...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 211:2, July 2016

Sometimes, it isn’t easy staying green. For some trees, staying green is set to become more of a challenge. Rising temperatures and changing precipitation patterns mean that droughts are likely to become more frequent in some regions. Drought affects the ability of a tree to maintain its leaf turgor – in other words, to avoid wilting – and some plants have been shown to deve...
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