How do conifers survive droughts?

From a University at Buffalo news release by Charlotte Hu. As the world warms, a new study is helping scientists understand how cone-bearing trees like pines and junipers may respond to drought. The research addresses a classic question in the field: When conditions are dry for long periods of time, do trees survive by growing new roots to tap water sources, or by relyin...
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Increasing tree mortality in a warming world

Trees in the tropics, especially important for the planet, face increasing threats. A mixture of factors is contributing to an increasing mortality rate of trees in the moist tropics. Trees in some areas are dying at about twice the rate that they were 35 years ago, according to a far-reaching study examining tree health in the tropical zone that spans South America to Africa ...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 210:2, April 2016

The mushroom on the cover of New Phytologist 210:2 could be assisting the spread of shrubs into the Arctic, and may play an important role in accelerating carbon losses from the warming tundra biome. The photograph, which accompanies the Letter ‘Stable isotope probing implicates a species of Cortinarius in carbon transfer through ectomycorrhizal fungal mycelial networks in A...
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Hidden orchid heterotrophs

While most green plants meet their entire demand for carbon through photosynthesis, some need a helping hand during particular life stages. Orchids produce seeds that require carbon and nutrients from mycorrhizal fungi for germination, a form of nutrition called ‘initial mycoheterotrophy’. Most orchids grow out of it, developing their own ability to fix carbon from photosynthes...
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