Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 219:1, July 2018

Those aren't coffee beans on the cover of New Phytologist 219:1, but pollen grains. Yuki Nakamura and colleagues from the Institute of Plant and Microbial Biology, Taiwan, and IMBIO, Germany, used a scanning electron microscope to capture the image. There is something wrong with these pollen grains. Look closely and you'll see that some of them appear crumpled, misshapen. ...
Read More

The yin-yang of uranium in Arabidopsis

Uranium isn't something people tend to think about in a positive light. But scientists from the Université Grenoble Alpes and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energies Commission (CEA) have shown how the toxic radionuclide can be beneficial in plants. Uranium is naturally present in the environment and can be redistributed by mining, military and agricultural activ...
Read More

Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 212:1, October 2016

Auxin is as crucial to plants as growth hormones are to developing humans. The phytohormone regulates almost all aspects of plant growth and development. The key to the way that auxin works lies in the uneven patterns in which it is transported throughout plant tissues. In many cases, this distribution is thought to be self-organising – auxin influences its own transport to con...
Read More

Keith Lindsey discusses hormone regulation of root growth

New Phytologist Editor Keith Lindsey was recently in conversation with GARNet’s Geraint Parry for the Arabidopsis Research Roundup. Keith was describing work that aims to dissect the complex hormonal regulation of root growth, in a paper by Rowe, et al., on which he is the corresponding author. The study investigates the hormonal network that regulates the response of Arabidops...
Read More