Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 217:4, March 2018

How to make a tumour Ustilago maydis is a biotrophic fungus that causes smut disease on maize, by reprogramming plant cells to produce massive tumours. Just how this happens at the cellular level in maize leaves has remained unknown, until now. In the paper behind the cover of New Phytologist 217:4, Alexandra Matei and Gunther Doehlemann, of the University of Cologne, tog...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 217:3, February 2018

The cover for New Phytologist 217:3 is rather special, being the first cover to feature a hand-drawn image since 2004. In this instalment of Behind the Cover, authors Claire Stanley and Guido Grossmann reveal more detail about the dual-flow-RootChip, the subject of their recent Methods paper. The artwork illustrates the dual-flow-RootChip, a new technology that enables r...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 217:2, January 2018

Beeten to it: the early origins of beetroot red Millions of years ago, one family of plants — the beets and their cousins — hit upon a brand new pigment and discarded the red used by the rest of the plant world. In the paper behind the cover of New Phytologist 217:2, Hiroshi Maeda and his colleagues describe an ancient loosening up of a key biochemical pathway that set the ...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 217:1, January 2018

The sunflowers on the cover of New Phytologist 217:1 provide much more than a cheerful picture – they could be vital for human health, explains author Laurent Mène-Saffrané in this guest post about the research behind the cover. Vitamin E is one of 13 essential vitamins that we need in our diet, since we can't produce it ourselves. This isoprenoid vitamin is produced exclusi...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 216:4, December 2017

Winter has come to Lake Miroir. Below the surface, deep down in the dark, the lakebed sediments tell a story of ice and fire. These days, snow covers the landscape from December to April, but this hasn't always been the case. This lake contains sediments from the last glaciation, which ended about 15,000 years ago in the Alps. Interestingly these sediments contain proof of a...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 216:3, November 2017

Trigger warning: how the Venus flytrap got its snap Botanical carnivory is just one of many ways in which plants have adapted to cope with low levels of nutrients in the soil. Carnivorous plants have evolved specialised leaves, called traps, for prey attraction, capture and digestion. The traps are usually less effective in photosynthesis, but extremely effective in obtaining ...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 216:1, October 2017

In the Viewpoint paper behind the image on the cover of New Phytologist 216:1, Florian Boucher and colleagues explain why, when it comes to diversification, size does matter. In the Knersvlakte, a closer look at the stony ground reveals that the quartzfields are actually carpeted with living stones: small succulent plants, belonging to the genus Argyroderma. Part of the Sout...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 215:4, September 2017

Fungal friend, or foe? In this issue of Behind the Cover, New Phytologist Editor Ian Dickie explains the complicated role of the mushroom gracing the cover of issue 215:4. Amanita muscaria, or fly agaric, is one of the most iconic of fungi: it is the classic mushroom of fairy tales and children's cartoons. Native to the northern hemisphere, it has become a widespread invasi...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 215:3, August 2017

From the roots up Getting back to your roots can lead to some interesting discoveries. In plants, the origin of roots has frequently been a controversial topic. Recent research published in New Phytologist suggests that the development of roots might have been far more interesting than we previously thought. A recently published paper by Fujinami et al. focuses on the organ...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 215:2, July 2017

Going back to your roots Lycophyte (a group of plants more commonly known as clubmosses) roots are interesting because evidence suggests that, despite their similar appearance, they evolved independently of those in other vascular plants (euphyllophytes). To get to the bottom of this, you have to look at the differences in the ways that their roots branch. In a recent Tansley ...
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