Accepted articles: New Phytologist, faster

At New Phytologist we strive to offer the best possible service to our authors and readers. Our Central Office team and Editorial Board work hard to ensure that we offer a fast and rigorous peer review process, as well as a quick article production process for those articles that are accepted for publication. To this end, we are very pleased to announce that we have recently be...
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Revealing fungal function

Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 220:4, December 2018 If you went down to the woods this autumn, did you take a moment to have a closer look at the fungi at your feet, to ponder how they could be affected by changes in the way that woodlands are managed? If you didn't, don't worry - that's exactly what New Phytologist Interaction Section Editor, Prof. Francis Martin, has bee...
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How to trick a hornet

Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 220:3, November 2018 Plants use a variety of ingenious mechanisms to arrange for the onward transport of their seeds by unsuspecting creatures. Stemona tuberosa might employ one of the strangest seed dispersal methods of all. The photograph on the cover of New Phytologist 220:3 shows a hornet (Vespa velutina) biting off a diaspore (seed plus ...
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Climbing up to keep cool  – Climate change effects on mountain ecosystems

There are two things that make trekking in the Alps so good: the thick hot chocolate waiting for you in the refuge, and the variety of landscapes on offer. Along the mountain slope, different ecosystems are stratified one on top of the other, but recently all of them have been greatly affected by climate change, as the temperature in the Alps has increased faster than the glob...
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Prof. Sir David Smith (1930–2018)

Professor Sir David Smith (1930–2018) It is with sadness that we note the death of Professor Sir David Smith FRS FRSE FLS on 29th June 2018. Sir David was a former Editor-in-Chief (Executive Editor) and Trustee of New Phytologist. David Smith joined the editorial board in 1965, and shortly afterwards became Executive Editor (Editor-in-Chief), a position he held for 17 years. ...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 220:2, October 2018

The search for tabaiba Dust and desert sand billowed from the back of the black 4x4 as it pitched and bumped along the deeply rutted track. Lisa Pokorny and Riki Riina had been searching the flat and deserted landscape, scanning the parched, orange horizon, deep in the Western Sahara, for two days. With success seeming increasingly remote, they crested a rise and were finally ...
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Fungi matter: State of the World’s Fungi 2018

Today sees the release of the State of the World’s Fungi 2018. This is the third report from the ambitious and far reaching State of the World’s Plants and Fungi project led by scientists at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, supported by the Sfumato Foundation. The project aims to assess our knowledge of the diversity of plants and fungi on Earth, the challenges and threats they ...
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Better safe than sorry: Soil microbiota puts tomato in a state of alert (+ Italian version)

You can also read this post in Italian – scroll down. You probably know that there are trillions of microorganisms living all over our bodies, especially enjoying our warm and appetising guts. The population of microbes that help our digestion, or simply hang around our bodies, is called the microbiota, and plants have one as well. The plant microbiota is particularly concentr...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 220:1, October 2018

To calcify, or not to calcify? Often, it's the smallest things, when taken together, that have the largest impacts. Calcification in the oceans – when calcium accumulates in the body tissues of an organism – is a major sink of carbon dioxide (CO2), and an important influence on the global carbon cycle. Calcification is a key aspect of the biology of the coccolithophores – a gr...
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How rice spots its relatives underground: Kin recognition and productivity

minute read. If you think that life in the city is crowded, you have never been a root. The world beneath the soil surface is busier than any metropolis. It is a place in which a root can find anything, from life-long mycorrhizal friendships, to pathogens waiting in dark alleys. Roots also meet other roots, from the same species and from different ones, growing all around, p...
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