Stella Cesari: 2017 New Phytologist Tansley Medal winner

Issue 219:1 of New Phytologist features the work of the 2017 Tansley Medal winner Stella Cesari and her fellow finalists. The New Phytologist Tansley Medal is awarded each year to an early career scientist (or scientists) in recognition of their contribution to research in plant science. It is always a great pleasure to work on the issue that features the Tansley Medal insights...
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Celebrating 100 posts

I recently published the 100th post on this blog and, I must admit, it crept up on me. It doesn't feel as though much time has passed since I published the very first post, but that was all the way back in February 2016. Much like the riotous vegetation that crowds the canal towpath on my cycle route to work at this time of year, the blog has grown with considerable vigour. It'...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 219:1, July 2018

Those aren't coffee beans on the cover of New Phytologist 219:1, but pollen grains. Yuki Nakamura and colleagues from the Institute of Plant and Microbial Biology, Taiwan, and IMBIO, Germany, used a scanning electron microscope to capture the image. There is something wrong with these pollen grains. Look closely and you'll see that some of them appear crumpled, misshapen. ...
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A week in publishing

Last June, I was fortunate enough to attend the Gatsby Plant Science Summer School, where I heard from a host of academics and was delighted to find that botany could be a springboard to another career. Professor Alistair Hetherington (Editor in Chief of New Phytologist and holder of the Melville Wills Chair in Botany) and Dr Kerry Franklin (Reader in plant environmental signal...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 218:4, May 2018

How plants breathe under water Two rice leaves emerge from floodwater. The one on the right has superhydrophobic cuticles, and thus the submerged portion of the leaf traps a thin layer of gas (visible as a silvery sheen). The leaf on the left has been brushed with a dilute detergent to remove hydrophobicity and prevent the gas film from forming. The photo shows how effectiv...
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Introducing Herbaria 3.0

"Every species has a narrative of its own, a biography. The loss of a species is not just one lower point on a graph of biodiversity, it is also the loss of a unique story." – Richard Fortey, 2012. Plants are everywhere, and everyone has a story to tell about a plant. We are excited to introduce Herbaria 3.0, a collaborative, digital environmental humanities project, that off...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 218:3, May 2018

In this instalment of Behind the Cover, Kai Konrad describes the exciting combination of methods that his research group is using to find out more about the growth of pollen tubes. My group is interested in the role of ion channels, particularly anion channels, in pollen tube growth. Pollen tubes are formed after pollen (the male gametophyte) land on the stigma, a female part ...
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Congratulations to the 2018 L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science Laureates

Last week in Paris, a group of outstanding scientists were recognised for their work and achievements. These five individuals were selected from Africa and the Arab States, Europe, Latin America, North America, and Asia–Pacific. While recognising exceptional achievement is not in itself rare, this event was particularly special: in this case the recognition came from the L’Oréa...
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How to spot the wood despite the trees

Research published in New Phytologist highlights a promising new method for plant identification based on chemical fingerprinting. Identifying trees can be tricky.  Especially in environments with high levels of diversity, where groups of very closely related, morphologically similar trees co-exist.  This is particularly true in tropical rainforests. Traditionally botanists h...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 218:2: April 2018

Hyperaccumulator plants have the unusual ability to accumulate extreme concentrations of metal(loid)s in their living tissues. In the Tansley review behind the latest cover of New Phytologist, Antony van der Ent and colleagues discuss the different techniques, based on X-rays, used for probing the internal distribution and chemical form of different elements in plants. The cov...
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