Special Issue: Plant developmental evolution

Exploring plant evo-devo: a new special issue New Phytologist 216:2 is a special issue. Plant developmental evolution draws together a selection of papers exploring the relatively young field of plant evo-devo, and is the result of the 37th New Phytologist Symposium – Plant developmental evolution, which was held in Beijing last year and attracted a wide array of researchers, ...
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Plant epigenetics: from mechanisms to ecological relevance

In a guest post for the New Phyt blog, winner of the 40th New Phytologist Symposium poster prize, Sofia van Moorsel, describes the highlights of the Symposium. Find out more about Sofia's poster here. The 40th New Phytologist Symposium on Plant epigenetics: from mechanisms to ecological relevance was held in Vienna from 12–15 September 2017. It started in a very promising wa...
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Katie Field: Underground and overground at ICOM9

In this guest post, Katie Field, researcher in plant-soil interactions and leader of the Field lab at the University of Leeds, UK, reports back from ICOM9, the 9th International Conference on Mycorrhiza, with a round-up of the highlights (and desserts). Mycorrhizal researchers from around the globe converged on the Clarion Congress Hotel in Prague on the 30th July for a week...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 216:1, October 2017

In the Viewpoint paper behind the image on the cover of New Phytologist 216:1, Florian Boucher and colleagues explain why, when it comes to diversification, size does matter. In the Knersvlakte, a closer look at the stony ground reveals that the quartzfields are actually carpeted with living stones: small succulent plants, belonging to the genus Argyroderma. Part of the Sout...
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The New Phytologist Trust at the 19th International Botanical Congress, Shenzhen, China, July 2017

Some of the New Phytologist Trust team, including Editors, Trustees, and Central office staff recently attended the 19th International Botanical Congress in Shenzhen, China. The congress was a very lively event and we were able to meet many contributors to the journal at our exhibition booth. Many thanks to all of delegates that stopped by! The New Phytologist Trust ...
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A winning poster about mangroves at ATBC 2017

Last month, we were pleased to congratulate Diana de la Cruz, winner of the New Phytologist poster prize at the 54th Annual Meeting of the Association of Tropical Biology and Conservation. I caught up with Diana after the meeting, to find out more about her winning poster. Please tell me about yourself and your career to date I'm a biologist, graduated with Honours from UNA...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 215:4, September 2017

Fungal friend, or foe? In this issue of Behind the Cover, New Phytologist Editor Ian Dickie explains the complicated role of the mushroom gracing the cover of issue 215:4. Amanita muscaria, or fly agaric, is one of the most iconic of fungi: it is the classic mushroom of fairy tales and children's cartoons. Native to the northern hemisphere, it has become a widespread invasi...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 215:3, August 2017

From the roots up Getting back to your roots can lead to some interesting discoveries. In plants, the origin of roots has frequently been a controversial topic. Recent research published in New Phytologist suggests that the development of roots might have been far more interesting than we previously thought. A recently published paper by Fujinami et al. focuses on the organ...
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Cucumbers in space

Scientists at Tohoku University in Japan have untangled the competing influences of water and gravity on plant roots – by growing cucumbers in spaceflight. Plant roots grow to find water – a process called hydrotropism. Roots are also influenced by gravity and tend to grow downwards – this is called gravitropism. Studying the effect of hydrotropism on roots on Earth is di...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 215:2, July 2017

Going back to your roots Lycophyte (a group of plants more commonly known as clubmosses) roots are interesting because evidence suggests that, despite their similar appearance, they evolved independently of those in other vascular plants (euphyllophytes). To get to the bottom of this, you have to look at the differences in the ways that their roots branch. In a recent Tansley ...
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