Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 215:2, July 2017

Going back to your roots Lycophyte (a group of plants more commonly known as clubmosses) roots are interesting because evidence suggests that, despite their similar appearance, they evolved independently of those in other vascular plants (euphyllophytes). To get to the bottom of this, you have to look at the differences in the ways that their roots branch. In a recent Tansley ...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 215:1, July 2017

"The Amazon forest is a pretty amazing place. There are so many magnificent trees, magical plants and fungi, strangely twisted and contorted lianas, not to mention the insects, spiders, and snakes, that I think I could spend the whole day taking pictures." In this instalment of our Behind the Cover series, New Phytologist Editor Richard Norby talks us through the research behi...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 214:4, June 2017

The image on the cover of New Phytologist 214:4 shows Diplostephium cinereum, a species that inhabits the high elevations (3900–4600 m) of Peru, Bolivia, and Chile. Hamilton Beltrán, a collaborator with lead author Oscar Vargas, took the picture near the province of Yauyo in central Peru at an elevation of 4500 m. I caught up with Oscar to find out some more details about...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 214:3, May 2017

The cover image for New Phytologist 214:3 accompanies the Feature Issue, Tropical plants and ecosystem function. In our latest Behind the Cover, we talk to Cecilia Chavana-Bryant, who spent two years undertaking fieldwork in the Amazon, and who contributed two articles to the Feature issue, and to documentary photographer Jake Bryant who captured the image. We learn about Cecil...
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Trees need a little help to reclaim deforested land

Last month I caught up with Sascha Ismail and Chris Kettle, to talk about their recent paper, 'Evaluating realized seed dispersal across fragmented tropical landscapes: a two-fold approach using parentage analysis and the neighbourhood model'. Listen to the interview, and read the blog post, reproduced from an original post on Mongabay, below. Mike Whitfield Development...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 214:2, April 2017

As any diver will tell you, air embolisms (when a bubble of gas blocks the flow in a vital artery) are bad news. Plants can suffer from them too, particularly during drought, but we still have much to learn about how vulnerable the xylem in different parts of a plant are to embolism, or how they might spread when they do happen. In the research behind this issue’s cover imag...
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Mum is always right: Environmental effects on plant biology across generations

This guest post is reposted from Gabriela Auge’s original post, with permission. Read Gabriela’s Tansley insight: Adjusting phenotypes via within- and across-generational plasticity. Living organisms change their behaviour in response to their environment. But they can also change their behaviour because of the environment that their mothers experienced. Plants perceive seas...
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How to publish your work in New Phytologist

In two short videos, New Phytologist Editor-in-Chief Prof Alistair Hetherington provides a step by step guide for early career researchers, intending to publish their work in New Phytologist. "One of my top tips would be: get the author list decided very early on." Alistair talks through the process of working out whether research is within the scope of the journal, deciding ...
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Scanning the genetic barcode of plant-pollinator interactions

Tracking changes in ecosystems is both vital and extremely difficult. We need to know how differences in climate and land use will affect the success of different species, and what impacts this will have on the wider environment. Plant-pollinator interactions are particularly important for the stability of ecological communities, but how will these relationships be affected in ...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 214:1, April 2017

The cover image for New Phytologist 214:1 raises many questions. Is this mushroom-like organism a flowering plant? How does it survive? In this instalment of Behind the Cover, Tansley review authors Vincent Merckx and Sean Graham describe how they found this mysterious plant, and why it is important to study. Sean: The image shows an open flower of a fairy lantern (Thismia r...
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