The importance of being sticky

The composition of the cell walls of land plants allows them to grow upright and gives them a sturdy structure that is essential for living out of water. This is possible thanks to a complex matrix made of cellulose fibrils, proteins and polysaccharides. One of these polysaccharides is called Xyloglucan, and it sticks cellulose fibrils together in a dynamic way. For a while sc...
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Feeling the (pollen tube) force

If you think about a pollen grain that, after all of that bee-hitchhiking, has landed on the sweet stigma of the right flower, you might think that it has finally arrived. But from the pollen grain’s point of view its active struggle has just started – it now has to penetrate through the stigma tissue to localise and fertilise the ovule. Most of the research carried out on thi...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 219:4, September 2018

Dawn light filters through fog between the trees. The scent of needles rises as the air warms. Leaves drip. Emily Burns walks between redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) on the Californian coast. Donning a helmet and harness, Emily clips onto a rope and climbs high into the canopy. As she ascends, the light brightens and the fog thins. Finally reaching a height of 72 metres, Emily...
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The flora and fauna of Magdalen College

In a guest post for the New Phyt blog, Sandy Hetherington introduces a new exhibition, 'The Flora and Fauna of Magdalen College' currently on display in Magdalen College, Oxford, UK, which celebrates the links between Magdalen College and New Phytologist. The aim of the exhibition is to celebrate both the zoological and botanical history of the College. The fauna side of the...
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Plants, people, pub quizzes – the Plant Environmental Physiology Group Early Career Symposium

In a joint guest post for the New Phyt blog, Sarah Carroll and Alison Tidy report on the recent Plant Environmental Physiology Group Early Career Scientist Symposium, sponsored by Plants, People, Planet. Sarah and Alison won the prizes for Best Poster and Best Talk, respectively. Congratulations Sarah and Alison! A group of eager early career plant physiologists descended upon...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 219:3, August 2018

It's been hot, hasn't it? While many of us have been enjoying the sunshine, long dry spells are a challenge for plants. The way in which plants control the water content in their leaves is a critical part of their response to climate change. Researchers are finding out more about the ways that plants reduce transpiration rates when their leaves dry out. The photo, taken by Ch...
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Food for thought: the N8 Agrifood Conference 2018

Plants, People, Planet Managing Editor Bennett Young recently attended the N8 Agrifood conference in Liverpool. Also attending was Elspeth Ransom, a PhD student in Katherine Denby's lab at the University of York and Warwick University. Read on for Elspeth's round-up of the key points from the conference. Food system challenges are complex, global issues which can only be tackl...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 219:2, July 2018

High up in the Cordillera Blanca of the Peruvian Andes, the grey of the barren rock is broken by the delicate purple flowers of Lupinus huaronensis. Hunkering in its unusual acaulescent (stem-less) growth form at an elevation of 4,550 metres, the plant is well adapted to the diurnal freeze-thaw conditions found in the high elevation Andean grassland (Paramo, Puna, Jalca) habita...
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Stella Cesari: 2017 New Phytologist Tansley Medal winner

Issue 219:1 of New Phytologist features the work of the 2017 Tansley Medal winner Stella Cesari and her fellow finalists. The New Phytologist Tansley Medal is awarded each year to an early career scientist (or scientists) in recognition of their contribution to research in plant science. It is always a great pleasure to work on the issue that features the Tansley Medal insights...
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