A week in publishing

Last June, I was fortunate enough to attend the Gatsby Plant Science Summer School, where I heard from a host of academics and was delighted to find that botany could be a springboard to another career. Professor Alistair Hetherington (Editor in Chief of New Phytologist and holder of the Melville Wills Chair in Botany) and Dr Kerry Franklin (Reader in plant environmental signal...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 218:4, May 2018

How plants breathe under water Two rice leaves emerge from floodwater. The one on the right has superhydrophobic cuticles, and thus the submerged portion of the leaf traps a thin layer of gas (visible as a silvery sheen). The leaf on the left has been brushed with a dilute detergent to remove hydrophobicity and prevent the gas film from forming. The photo shows how effectiv...
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Introducing Herbaria 3.0

"Every species has a narrative of its own, a biography. The loss of a species is not just one lower point on a graph of biodiversity, it is also the loss of a unique story." – Richard Fortey, 2012. Plants are everywhere, and everyone has a story to tell about a plant. We are excited to introduce Herbaria 3.0, a collaborative, digital environmental humanities project, that off...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 218:3, May 2018

In this instalment of Behind the Cover, Kai Konrad describes the exciting combination of methods that his research group is using to find out more about the growth of pollen tubes. My group is interested in the role of ion channels, particularly anion channels, in pollen tube growth. Pollen tubes are formed after pollen (the male gametophyte) land on the stigma, a female part ...
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Congratulations to the 2018 L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science Laureates

Last week in Paris, a group of outstanding scientists were recognised for their work and achievements. These five individuals were selected from Africa and the Arab States, Europe, Latin America, North America, and Asia–Pacific. While recognising exceptional achievement is not in itself rare, this event was particularly special: in this case the recognition came from the L’Oréa...
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How to spot the wood despite the trees

Research published in New Phytologist highlights a promising new method for plant identification based on chemical fingerprinting. Identifying trees can be tricky.  Especially in environments with high levels of diversity, where groups of very closely related, morphologically similar trees co-exist.  This is particularly true in tropical rainforests. Traditionally botanists h...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 218:2: April 2018

Hyperaccumulator plants have the unusual ability to accumulate extreme concentrations of metal(loid)s in their living tissues. In the Tansley review behind the latest cover of New Phytologist, Antony van der Ent and colleagues discuss the different techniques, based on X-rays, used for probing the internal distribution and chemical form of different elements in plants. The cov...
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Pick of the bunch: 2017’s top New Phytologist papers according to Altmetric

What were the most popular New Phytologist papers in the news and on social media in 2017? Find out with our infographic below, then scroll down to find out more about each of the papers! You might notice some differences between the Altmetric Attention Scores in our infographic and those below – this is because Altmetric scores continuously update to reflect how many mentio...
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Increasing tree mortality in a warming world

Trees in the tropics, especially important for the planet, face increasing threats. A mixture of factors is contributing to an increasing mortality rate of trees in the moist tropics. Trees in some areas are dying at about twice the rate that they were 35 years ago, according to a far-reaching study examining tree health in the tropical zone that spans South America to Africa ...
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Flood, drought and disease tolerant – one gene to rule them all

A newly discovered gene in rice confers flood tolerance, drought tolerance and disease resistance. The discovery is a major step forward on the quest to produce climate smart crops. An international collaboration between researchers at the University of Copenhagen, Nagoya University and the University of Western Australia has resulted in a breakthrough in plant biology. Since ...
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