Food for thought: the N8 Agrifood Conference 2018

Plants, People, Planet Managing Editor Bennett Young recently attended the N8 Agrifood conference in Liverpool. Also attending was Elspeth Ransom, a PhD student in Katherine Denby's lab at the University of York and Warwick University. Read on for Elspeth's round-up of the key points from the conference. Food system challenges are complex, global issues which can only be tackl...
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A week in publishing

Last June, I was fortunate enough to attend the Gatsby Plant Science Summer School, where I heard from a host of academics and was delighted to find that botany could be a springboard to another career. Professor Alistair Hetherington (Editor in Chief of New Phytologist and holder of the Melville Wills Chair in Botany) and Dr Kerry Franklin (Reader in plant environmental signal...
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Introducing Herbaria 3.0

"Every species has a narrative of its own, a biography. The loss of a species is not just one lower point on a graph of biodiversity, it is also the loss of a unique story." – Richard Fortey, 2012. Plants are everywhere, and everyone has a story to tell about a plant. We are excited to introduce Herbaria 3.0, a collaborative, digital environmental humanities project, that off...
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My take on the Next Generation Scientists 2017 meeting

As you have seen, there were a number of interesting talks given over the second New Phytologist’s Next Generation Scientists meeting back in the summer of 2017.  I was lucky to be helping there myself.  If you attended, you may have spotted me running around with a microphone while the speakers were taking questions or even seen me by my poster.  Summaries of the event are ava...
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Rethinking fungal ecology?

"… as readers, reviewers, researchers, or editors, we should be prepared to re-think fungal ecology, and describe niches beyond those our respective domains of research predict." When we talk about fungal ecology, we tend to think of a set of disciplines that investigate the distinct ecological roles of fungi. Phytopathology looks for parasitic fungi. Research on mycorrhizae (...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 217:3, February 2018

The cover for New Phytologist 217:3 is rather special, being the first cover to feature a hand-drawn image since 2004. In this instalment of Behind the Cover, authors Claire Stanley and Guido Grossmann reveal more detail about the dual-flow-RootChip, the subject of their recent Methods paper. The artwork illustrates the dual-flow-RootChip, a new technology that enables r...
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Prof. Dali Guo, 1971–2017

Dali Guo passed away on 19 November 2017 at the young age of 46 after an extended fight with lung cancer. He leaves behind his loving wife, Ping Wang and 14-year-old daughter, Hengjia. All who knew Dali recognized a person who had a keen intellect, driving curiosity of the natural world, and the organizational skills to mobilize research teams to answer critical question...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 217:1, January 2018

The sunflowers on the cover of New Phytologist 217:1 provide much more than a cheerful picture – they could be vital for human health, explains author Laurent Mène-Saffrané in this guest post about the research behind the cover. Vitamin E is one of 13 essential vitamins that we need in our diet, since we can't produce it ourselves. This isoprenoid vitamin is produced exclusi...
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Tricks, traps & tree shrew toilets

In this guest post, Chris Thorogood writes about some of the ingenious mechanisms that pitcher plants use to trap prey, reviewed in his recent Tansley insight. The pitcher trap is a striking example of convergent evolution: unrelated lineages of pitcher plants have independently evolved remarkably similar traps as adaptations to growing in nutrient-poor environments. In fact...
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Freud in Cambridge

In this guest post, Peter Ayres contributes a review of Freud in Cambridge, by John Forrester and Laura Cameron. Do you have a book review you would like to contribute to the New Phyt blog? Please get in touch. Titles can be misleading, so please don’t jump to the conclusion that Freud in Cambridge, by John Forrester and Laura Cameron, has little to offer botanists.  One of ...
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