Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 219:4, September 2018

Dawn light filters through fog between the trees. The scent of needles rises as the air warms. Leaves drip. Emily Burns walks between redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) on the Californian coast. Donning a helmet and harness, Emily clips onto a rope and climbs high into the canopy. As she ascends, the light brightens and the fog thins. Finally reaching a height of 72 metres, Emily...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 219:3, August 2018

It's been hot, hasn't it? While many of us have been enjoying the sunshine, long dry spells are a challenge for plants. The way in which plants control the water content in their leaves is a critical part of their response to climate change. Researchers are finding out more about the ways that plants reduce transpiration rates when their leaves dry out. The photo, taken by Ch...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 219:2, July 2018

High up in the Cordillera Blanca of the Peruvian Andes, the grey of the barren rock is broken by the delicate purple flowers of Lupinus huaronensis. Hunkering in its unusual acaulescent (stem-less) growth form at an elevation of 4,550 metres, the plant is well adapted to the diurnal freeze-thaw conditions found in the high elevation Andean grassland (Paramo, Puna, Jalca) habita...
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Celebrating 100 posts

I recently published the 100th post on this blog and, I must admit, it crept up on me. It doesn't feel as though much time has passed since I published the very first post, but that was all the way back in February 2016. Much like the riotous vegetation that crowds the canal towpath on my cycle route to work at this time of year, the blog has grown with considerable vigour. It'...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 219:1, July 2018

Those aren't coffee beans on the cover of New Phytologist 219:1, but pollen grains. Yuki Nakamura and colleagues from the Institute of Plant and Microbial Biology, Taiwan, and IMBIO, Germany, used a scanning electron microscope to capture the image. There is something wrong with these pollen grains. Look closely and you'll see that some of them appear crumpled, misshapen. ...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 218:4, May 2018

How plants breathe under water Two rice leaves emerge from floodwater. The one on the right has superhydrophobic cuticles, and thus the submerged portion of the leaf traps a thin layer of gas (visible as a silvery sheen). The leaf on the left has been brushed with a dilute detergent to remove hydrophobicity and prevent the gas film from forming. The photo shows how effectiv...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 218:3, May 2018

In this instalment of Behind the Cover, Kai Konrad describes the exciting combination of methods that his research group is using to find out more about the growth of pollen tubes. My group is interested in the role of ion channels, particularly anion channels, in pollen tube growth. Pollen tubes are formed after pollen (the male gametophyte) land on the stigma, a female part ...
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Behind the Cover: New Phytologist 218:2: April 2018

Hyperaccumulator plants have the unusual ability to accumulate extreme concentrations of metal(loid)s in their living tissues. In the Tansley review behind the latest cover of New Phytologist, Antony van der Ent and colleagues discuss the different techniques, based on X-rays, used for probing the internal distribution and chemical form of different elements in plants. The cov...
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Pick of the bunch: 2017’s top New Phytologist papers according to Altmetric

What were the most popular New Phytologist papers in the news and on social media in 2017? Find out with our infographic below, then scroll down to find out more about each of the papers! You might notice some differences between the Altmetric Attention Scores in our infographic and those below – this is because Altmetric scores continuously update to reflect how many mentio...
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