The Gunnera trick

Lofty peaks and a very high rate of succession grace the cover of New Phytologist 223:2, courtesy of Alberto Benavent-González. Below he explains the story behind his research. We are looking at the very front of the Pia Glacier, located at the southern side of the Darwin Range in Tierra del Fuego (Chile). This glacier, as many others in the region, is retreating rapidly an...
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Snow is not always white

In some coastal areas in Antarctica, the snow can look red, orange, green, or a blend of all three. This colour is natural and is actually made up of tiny microscopic living cells called snow-algae. Red snow‐algae bloom on Léonie Island, Ryder Bay, Antarctic Peninsula. Courtesy of Matthew Davey. Snow algae are tiny plants that can survive and bloom in the slushy snow du...
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Feeding plants, feeding people – but what about the planet?

The impact of humans on our planet is something which is (quite rightly) receiving increasingly urgent coverage. But what might not be quite so obvious – amongst a sea of stock photos featuring industrial chimneys and car exhausts – is the contribution of agriculture to these damaging processes. The Earth’s human population is currently 7.7 billion people and growing – that...
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Grow your own food security?

There is an increasing recognition in both the scientific literature and amongst the general population of the benefits of 'grow your own' food. Not only does growing your own provide you with fresh and healthy produce straight from your own back yard, there are a myriad of social and environmental benefits as well. Gardening can support a wide range of biodiversity and hel...
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The flora and fauna of Magdalen College

In a guest post for the New Phyt blog, Sandy Hetherington introduces a new exhibition, 'The Flora and Fauna of Magdalen College' currently on display in Magdalen College, Oxford, UK, which celebrates the links between Magdalen College and New Phytologist. The aim of the exhibition is to celebrate both the zoological and botanical history of the College. The fauna side of the...
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Plants, people, pub quizzes – the Plant Environmental Physiology Group Early Career Symposium

In a joint guest post for the New Phyt blog, Sarah Carroll and Alison Tidy report on the recent Plant Environmental Physiology Group Early Career Scientist Symposium, sponsored by Plants, People, Planet. Sarah and Alison won the prizes for Best Poster and Best Talk, respectively. Congratulations Sarah and Alison! A group of eager early career plant physiologists descended upon...
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Food for thought: the N8 Agrifood Conference 2018

Plants, People, Planet Managing Editor Bennett Young recently attended the N8 Agrifood conference in Liverpool. Also attending was Elspeth Ransom, a PhD student in Katherine Denby's lab at the University of York and Warwick University. Read on for Elspeth's round-up of the key points from the conference. Food system challenges are complex, global issues which can only be tackl...
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A week in publishing

Last June, I was fortunate enough to attend the Gatsby Plant Science Summer School, where I heard from a host of academics and was delighted to find that botany could be a springboard to another career. Professor Alistair Hetherington (Editor in Chief of New Phytologist and holder of the Melville Wills Chair in Botany) and Dr Kerry Franklin (Reader in plant environmental signal...
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Introducing Herbaria 3.0

"Every species has a narrative of its own, a biography. The loss of a species is not just one lower point on a graph of biodiversity, it is also the loss of a unique story." – Richard Fortey, 2012. Plants are everywhere, and everyone has a story to tell about a plant. We are excited to introduce Herbaria 3.0, a collaborative, digital environmental humanities project, that off...
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My take on the Next Generation Scientists 2017 meeting

As you have seen, there were a number of interesting talks given over the second New Phytologist’s Next Generation Scientists meeting back in the summer of 2017.  I was lucky to be helping there myself.  If you attended, you may have spotted me running around with a microphone while the speakers were taking questions or even seen me by my poster.  Summaries of the event are ava...
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